Sunday, July 7, 2013

How Many Applications Are In A Pan of Blush?

I've already calculated how many swipes are in a tube of lipstick and how many applications you have in a bottle of foundation given various application methods. At the request of a few commenters, I dusted off my accurate-to-the-milligram scale to examine the longevity of my blush next.

For this test, I used the Rimmel London Lasting Finish Blendable Powder Blush in Santa Rose (for no reason other than that the packaging is super lightweight, meaning my scale won't get mad at me for using it). It's a lovely peachy rose that is light enough to look great on fair skin.


I applied this blush ten times to ensure that I had a decent mean from which to calculate.

The raw data for each use is shown below:

0.015g

0.022
g
0.009
g
0.013
g
0.018
g
0.011
g
0.014g

0.012g

0.008g

0.017g


Mean= 0.014g
A single application of this blush looks like this on my cheeks.
Rimmel has 0.15oz/4g of product. Thus, at, 0.014g per application, this blush has approximately 286 applications. Because this blush retails for about $3.99, that means that each use is worth just shy of one and a half cents.

The generalizability of this result is pretty unclear. I speculate that women with darker skin will probably need to have a slightly heavier hand on blush application than women with lighter skin, and the variability in blush pigmentation will almost certainly affect how much use you get out of any given product.

However, assuming that this mass remains relatively consistent across blushes and humans, you can use these findings to calculate an estimated number of uses for any blush you love. For example, at 0.25oz/7.08g for $28, Benefit's Dandelion should last about 506 applications, costing you five and a half cents per use. NARS Orgasm, at 0.16oz/4.5g for $29, might last 321 applications, ringing it at over nine cents per use.

13 comments:

  1. Awesome! This does make NARS Orgasm a good deal for me, I think, if it lasts that many applications.

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  2. Thank you for another great post. I don't think I've ever used up an entire container of blush. I do tend to toss make-up after it has sat around for a while due to my rabid decluttering habit. Blush just seems to last forever... Good to know how inexpensive it is per use, and how many applications there are per container.

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  3. Couple of things (okay maybe more than a couple, I might lie):

    1) I really, really, REALLY appreciate the time and effort you put into your calculations posts and research behind bullshit beauty claims. I love it. Keep up the awesome work, seriously.

    2) Maybe I missed this in your previous posts, but do you mind if I ask how you figure out the amount of product that you use per application? In your "How many applications" posts, you calculate both the full product amount and the varying amount used in each test. Do you measure the amount picked up on your brush before you apply it, or measure the minute weight differences in the full pan after each go? Just trying to figure out your testing methods!

    3) (okay, so I did lie) There's this huge debate on "Natural hair vs. Synthetic hair" for make up brushes (particularly eyeshadow and powder products - not so much liquid or cream products) in which there are arguments that natural hair picks up product better, or synthetic hair is anti-bacterial. Personally, I find that synthetic hairs pick up a similar amount of product as natural, and the fact that it's "anti-bacterial" only depends on how one uses it. I do wonder sometimes if my thoughts are correct or not - it'd be great if you can look into this, with your magical scale and stuff!

    Other than that, I just want to say that you're awesome, love your blog, keep up the great work, and thanks for reading this :P

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    Replies
    1. 1. Thank you.

      2. I measure the difference in the pan/if I make myself a sample, the difference in that. Even if it doesn't all make it onto my face, it is product that is gone after use.

      3. I will look into it! I would need two brushes that were identical other than the material of the bristles, though, with might be hard to find.

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  4. This is pretty awesome. So going by your results my go-to blushes do really well!

    Kat Von D Truth weighs in at 7 grams so that's around 500 uses
    The Balm's Hot Mama weighs in at 7.08 grams so that's around 505 uses!

    Thanks for sharing!

    Also, what are you wearing on your lips in that picture?

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  5. Brilliant post, I love it when you do these!

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  6. Sephora just posted on Twitter about philosophy's DNA repairing anti-aging goop, time in a bottle I think it's called... Anyway, would you possibly do a post on topical 'DNA repair' creams? Seems like bull to me, but I don't know anything about it.

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    Replies
    1. HA. Yeah, I can do that. Is this the product: http://www.sephora.com/time-in-a-bottle-P379916 ?

      Delete
    2. Yup! That's the one. Here's the tweet

      Sephora ‏@Sephora 9 Jul
      DNA renewal complex + vitamin c8 activator = @lovephilosophy’s Time in a Bottle. Shop this age-defying serum: http://seph.me/11yNyv7
      Expand

      I'm no biologist, but it seems like DNA repair wouldn't be something achieved by a lotion.

      Delete
  7. awesome!!

    you've made it, thanks a lot!

    i have about 25g of blush (from many pans of course), and if a usage cost me 0.014g so i need 1786 applications. And if i'm applying blush twice a day, i need 893 days (2.45 year) to finish all of them. Not bad! *LOL

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  8. I am so in love with your blog (as you can tell since I'm commenting on an old post, whoops). I've been getting into make-up in the past year or so, and I love how conscious you are about consuming it. And as someone with a strong background in science at liberal arts school, I can get my daily science fix while still majoring in philosophy. Thanks so much for all the work you do!

    ReplyDelete

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